Presenter Information

Jason A. BengtsonFollow

Description

Current metadata schemas are largely analog technology grafted onto the digital format. They have three inherent limitations that need to be transcended: they generate a static product which must be changed manually, they revolve around the needs of human, rather than mechanistic agents, and they are limited by the imagination and organizational capabilities of human agency. The author argues that to meet future challenges metadata will have to take a more flexible, adaptive form that centers on the needs of the machine in searching, interpretation and organization until the information it proxies enters into the human sphere. The author further posits that one way to accomplish this is through the application of principles of emergence, which will allow for new levels of complexity to spontaneously emerge from static "base level" metadata. By remaking metadata into a filially interactive format, "base level" metadata units could create new levels of metadata as a result of simple rules of interaction, which would then allow new subject types and even organizational schemas to emerge in a synthetic, bottom-up fashion. The author offers two potential scenarios for carrying out this process, including a "cross-pollination" method geared for the unique challenges posed by the still largely un-semantic world wide web. The author would present his paper and cede the right to use his presentation slides and other materials, but would retain exclusive rights to the paper itself.

To access the full presentation for this session, please click on the "Download" button on te right.



Start Date

15-3-2012 3:15 PM

End Date

15-3-2012 4:15 PM

Target Audience

Public Libraries, Academic Libraries, School Libraries, Special Libraries, Technical Services

Technical Expertise

intermediate

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Mar 15th, 3:15 PM Mar 15th, 4:15 PM

Imagining Emergent Metadata, Realizing the Emergent Web

Current metadata schemas are largely analog technology grafted onto the digital format. They have three inherent limitations that need to be transcended: they generate a static product which must be changed manually, they revolve around the needs of human, rather than mechanistic agents, and they are limited by the imagination and organizational capabilities of human agency. The author argues that to meet future challenges metadata will have to take a more flexible, adaptive form that centers on the needs of the machine in searching, interpretation and organization until the information it proxies enters into the human sphere. The author further posits that one way to accomplish this is through the application of principles of emergence, which will allow for new levels of complexity to spontaneously emerge from static "base level" metadata. By remaking metadata into a filially interactive format, "base level" metadata units could create new levels of metadata as a result of simple rules of interaction, which would then allow new subject types and even organizational schemas to emerge in a synthetic, bottom-up fashion. The author offers two potential scenarios for carrying out this process, including a "cross-pollination" method geared for the unique challenges posed by the still largely un-semantic world wide web. The author would present his paper and cede the right to use his presentation slides and other materials, but would retain exclusive rights to the paper itself.

To access the full presentation for this session, please click on the "Download" button on te right.