Description

The decision for libraries to make print collections available in a digital format has already been made – the question is how to go digital in a way that is practical (considering funding, staff time, etc.) and useful for patrons (both local and remote). Given the decrease in technological cost and the increase in technological efficiencies, making paper maps available in a digital format is more feasible than ever before.

This presentation will describe how we moved from posting scanned maps online to offering a Google Mashup for scanned aerial photographs to utilizing ArcMap and ArcGIS server to turn historic paper maps into truly interactive digital maps.

We are using this technology for course support, faculty collaboration and special projects that highlight our unique cartographic collections.

I used ArcGIS Server software to display georeferenced maps in an interactive environment. Using the resource website for ArcGIS Server (and a self-guided crash course in JavaScript) I was able to create what amounted to a "proof of concept" site for historic maps.

For the most part, it is too early to tell how successful our efforts in the digital realm will be. However, both statistical and anecdotal evidence suggests that we are on the correct path – our historic photo site (http://map.lib.umn.edu/mhapo/) receives approximately 225 hits each week and everyone who plays with the test sites for the historic maps (http://z.umn.edu/mplscampusmaps) and aerial photographs (http://z.umn.edu/mplscampusaerials) of campus is quite excited about the future possibilities.


To access presentation materials for this session, click on the 'Download' button located to the right.

Start Date

15-3-2012 12:45 PM

End Date

15-3-2012 1:45 PM

Target Audience

Public Libraries, Academic Libraries, School Libraries, Special Libraries

Technical Expertise

basic

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Mar 15th, 12:45 PM Mar 15th, 1:45 PM

Bringing Historic Maps to Life: Adventures in ArcGIS Server and Spatial Scholarship

The decision for libraries to make print collections available in a digital format has already been made – the question is how to go digital in a way that is practical (considering funding, staff time, etc.) and useful for patrons (both local and remote). Given the decrease in technological cost and the increase in technological efficiencies, making paper maps available in a digital format is more feasible than ever before.

This presentation will describe how we moved from posting scanned maps online to offering a Google Mashup for scanned aerial photographs to utilizing ArcMap and ArcGIS server to turn historic paper maps into truly interactive digital maps.

We are using this technology for course support, faculty collaboration and special projects that highlight our unique cartographic collections.

I used ArcGIS Server software to display georeferenced maps in an interactive environment. Using the resource website for ArcGIS Server (and a self-guided crash course in JavaScript) I was able to create what amounted to a "proof of concept" site for historic maps.

For the most part, it is too early to tell how successful our efforts in the digital realm will be. However, both statistical and anecdotal evidence suggests that we are on the correct path – our historic photo site (http://map.lib.umn.edu/mhapo/) receives approximately 225 hits each week and everyone who plays with the test sites for the historic maps (http://z.umn.edu/mplscampusmaps) and aerial photographs (http://z.umn.edu/mplscampusaerials) of campus is quite excited about the future possibilities.


To access presentation materials for this session, click on the 'Download' button located to the right.