Proposed Session Title

Archiving research data for access, preservation, and sharing? We can do that.

Description

We live in a world of big data, e-science, digital humanities and collaborative cyberinfrastructures that enable scholarship to happen in new and amazing ways. But managing these digital data goes beyond storage, backup and security. Data management extends to maintaining long-term and often public access to important data sets that could lead to future discoveries. With this in mind, the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies now require grant proposals to include a data management plan on how the research data will be shared, accessible, and persevered. But how? Subject-based data repositories exist for several computing-intensive disciplines, such as high-energy physics or real-time climate monitoring. But who will manage the "long-tail" of smaller or multi-disciplinary research data.

Our institutional repositories (IR) could be the answer. With a a few key policy decisions, libraries are well-positioned to help researchers comply with mandates to share and archive their data. Whether you use DSpace, Fedora, E-prints, or Digital Commons, this talk will outline important issues to consider as you build new capacity with existing IR infrastructure, including size limitations, file formats, and metadata and documentation requirements. Finally it will explore lessons learned from archiving data in the University of Minnesota Libraries’ IR as part of our broader data management program.

Start Date

15-3-2012 12:45 PM

End Date

15-3-2012 1:45 PM

Target Audience

Academic Libraries, Special Libraries

Technical Expertise

basic

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Mar 15th, 12:45 PM Mar 15th, 1:45 PM

Archiving research data for access, preservation, and sharing? We can do that.

We live in a world of big data, e-science, digital humanities and collaborative cyberinfrastructures that enable scholarship to happen in new and amazing ways. But managing these digital data goes beyond storage, backup and security. Data management extends to maintaining long-term and often public access to important data sets that could lead to future discoveries. With this in mind, the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies now require grant proposals to include a data management plan on how the research data will be shared, accessible, and persevered. But how? Subject-based data repositories exist for several computing-intensive disciplines, such as high-energy physics or real-time climate monitoring. But who will manage the "long-tail" of smaller or multi-disciplinary research data.

Our institutional repositories (IR) could be the answer. With a a few key policy decisions, libraries are well-positioned to help researchers comply with mandates to share and archive their data. Whether you use DSpace, Fedora, E-prints, or Digital Commons, this talk will outline important issues to consider as you build new capacity with existing IR infrastructure, including size limitations, file formats, and metadata and documentation requirements. Finally it will explore lessons learned from archiving data in the University of Minnesota Libraries’ IR as part of our broader data management program.