Proposed Session Title

Teaching with Google Books: Research, Copyright, and Data Mining

Description

Google’s Google Books site is a rich resource that is probably underutilized by most educators. It has all kinds of potential for a) getting students into the research process in a way that they will enjoy (for example, they can see how a famous quote has been used/quoted , find out which books cite the journal article they are interested in, or check to see if a specific book covers a topic that they want to explore, etc.) ; b) teaching them about the deeper civic purpose and the evolving state of copyright law (here we can also touch briefly on related topics like plagiarism as well) ; and, c) exploring, with the help of Google Book's Ngram viewer, the promise and ethical issues surrounding the issue of data-mining and “non-consumptive” research, or research that is accomplished by "mining" books for data, as opposed to reading them (here issues of online privacy can also be touched on, as the same kind of data-mining that is used in the Ngram viewer can also be used to produce advertising portfolios on those who read). In addition to this, at the beginning of the presentation I will talk a bit about what Google Book search is, where it came from, and how it has evolved a bit over the years.


To access the full presentation for this session, click on the "Link to Full Text" button located to the right. Additional session resources are also available below.


Start Date

14-3-2012 10:30 AM

End Date

14-3-2012 11:30 AM

Target Audience

Academic Libraries, School Libraries

Technical Expertise

basic

 
Mar 14th, 10:30 AM Mar 14th, 11:30 AM

Teaching with Google Books: Research, Copyright, and Data Mining

Google’s Google Books site is a rich resource that is probably underutilized by most educators. It has all kinds of potential for a) getting students into the research process in a way that they will enjoy (for example, they can see how a famous quote has been used/quoted , find out which books cite the journal article they are interested in, or check to see if a specific book covers a topic that they want to explore, etc.) ; b) teaching them about the deeper civic purpose and the evolving state of copyright law (here we can also touch briefly on related topics like plagiarism as well) ; and, c) exploring, with the help of Google Book's Ngram viewer, the promise and ethical issues surrounding the issue of data-mining and “non-consumptive” research, or research that is accomplished by "mining" books for data, as opposed to reading them (here issues of online privacy can also be touched on, as the same kind of data-mining that is used in the Ngram viewer can also be used to produce advertising portfolios on those who read). In addition to this, at the beginning of the presentation I will talk a bit about what Google Book search is, where it came from, and how it has evolved a bit over the years.


To access the full presentation for this session, click on the "Link to Full Text" button located to the right. Additional session resources are also available below.