Session Title

Copyright Education: The good, the bad, and the ugly.

Description

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act, passed in 1998, requires any school that serves as an Internet Service Provider to provide “all of its users with informational materials describing and promoting compliance with copyright law.” A more recent law, the Higher Education Opportunity Act, requires colleges to inform students about the consequences of copyright infringement. Even without considering these mandates, good education about copyright is helpful for ALL people. That being said, copyright education is not easily accomplished. Copyright law professor Jessica Litman said it best: “The current copyright statute has proved to be remarkably education-resistant” (Digital Copyright, 2001). What can we do? Do librarians need to be copyright educators? What are colleges and universities doing to educate their students, staff, and faculty? What works? What is affordable? Come review the many items designed to promote copyright awareness -- and participate in hands-on exercises to design new “learning objects”.

Start Date

17-3-2010 11:20 AM

Copyright Education.pptx (213 kB)
Copyright Education.pptx

Resources Copyright Education.doc (28 kB)
Resources Copyright Education.doc

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Mar 17th, 11:20 AM

Copyright Education: The good, the bad, and the ugly.

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act, passed in 1998, requires any school that serves as an Internet Service Provider to provide “all of its users with informational materials describing and promoting compliance with copyright law.” A more recent law, the Higher Education Opportunity Act, requires colleges to inform students about the consequences of copyright infringement. Even without considering these mandates, good education about copyright is helpful for ALL people. That being said, copyright education is not easily accomplished. Copyright law professor Jessica Litman said it best: “The current copyright statute has proved to be remarkably education-resistant” (Digital Copyright, 2001). What can we do? Do librarians need to be copyright educators? What are colleges and universities doing to educate their students, staff, and faculty? What works? What is affordable? Come review the many items designed to promote copyright awareness -- and participate in hands-on exercises to design new “learning objects”.